Feature Announcement: More Repository Metrics!

September 17, 2019 in Announcements, Code Quality

A few weeks ago, we announced a new feature: Organization-wide metrics. We made available three charts that can help you and your team to raise questions and understand the impacts of process changes in all your repositories.

Today, we are glad to announce that those three metrics are available for each repository!

You can find this page by clicking on the Stats link. It stays in the header of each repository page, right before to Hotspots and Quick Fixes.

We are excited to delivery more repository-specific metrics because we understand that the contribution behavior may vary from repo to repo. The ability to drill down helps you and your team to see how each repository impacts in the whole company.

Reasons the development interaction among repositories differ, include their importance, size or age, programming language, or development phase. For instance, Pull Requests in a legacy project are usually not as dynamic as in a recently-started one. Also, often their size is more extensive and their complexity higher. It impacts directly into lead-time.

Pull request size may depend on its role. Purely front-end or back-end repositories tend to be smaller and faster to approve then monolithic-full-stack ones. If have multiple applications in the same repository check our subapps feature.

That’s why those graphs matter. They’re crucial to understand context-specific data and help you to improve your process and code quality. You can find them in the “Stats” link, in the header of any Repository Page.

In case you are not sure what the charts are useful for, I recommend you to read our previous announcement. However, if you are in a hurry, I summarized it below:

  • Pull Requests: this chart shows the dispersion of Lead-Time for pull requests. It’s a great tool to understand how many days are taking pull requests to be closed/merged.
  • Lead Time Histogram: lead-Time is the number of days a pull request remains open. Whether it was closed or merged, it does not matter.
  • Merged Pull Requests: it shows how many pull requests were closed or merged on a specific day. This chart is especially useful to understand the impact of high lead-times. As you decrease your lead-time, more pull requests are closed or merged by day.

Feedback appreciated

We are regularly polishing our product so that you can expect more information about your productivity, code quality, and process health in the future.

By now, I’d like to ask: are these charts useful? Feedback is always appreciated. Don’t hesitate to tell us your thoughts!

Start a 14-days-trial now and check how are your repositories and subapps doing!

Feature Announcement: We support Swiftlint!

September 10, 2019 in Announcements, Swift

Many companies are adopting Swift. They are migrating their codebases or starting new projects in this programming language. As developing to any other devices, it is essential to pay attention to good practices and style conventions. That’s why we are glad to announce that SourceLevel runs Swiftlint as one of our engines!

It is crucial to keep your code consistent and maintainable, be you a lonely programmer or part of a team. If you care about your code, Swiftlint really can help you out.

Folks from Realm maintain this linter, and it is open-source, just like the other linters we run. You can learn its options and parameters in Swiftlint’s README.md and configure them using your already known .sourcelevel.yml file.

Feedback appreciated

Feedback is always appreciated. If you have anything to share, don’t hesitate to get in touch!

Are you using Swift? Start a 14-days-trial now and get Swiftlint feedbacks in your pull request comments!

Accounts are now Organizations and they got a dedicated page!

September 6, 2019 in Announcements

It’s part of our culture to be always polishing our product. During the evolution, some times, names get obsolete. It happened to the term Account, that was not communicating well what it became.

We renamed it to Organization, which describes much clearer what it is. Organizations group repositories together and also are where you manage your GitHub integration and billing information.

In this process, we took the opportunity to create a dedicated page for each Organization. There now you find a list of the latest 5 reviewed repositories below a merged pull requests chart. You can still list all Organization’s repositories by clicking on “Repositories,” located in the left menu. It makes your life easier and tidy!

If you belong to multiple organizations, you can switch them by using the Organization Jumper. When you log in, SourceLevel redirects you to the last-selected Organization’s page.

In case you want to navigate among your repositories, you don’t need to look by them in the Repositories listing page. You can quickly change your working repository by using the Repository Jumper, also located in the header. This Jumper already existed, the only difference is that now it is scoped by the Organization.

We love feedback!

Did you like it? We want to hear from you! Share your thoughts with us!

Are you not using SourceLevel yet? Start using it now! It’s free for 14-days and permanently free for open-source repositories.

Feature Announcement: Organization-wide Metrics

August 28, 2019 in Announcements

We’re very excited to announce a significant feature: organization-wide metrics.

SourceLevel measures the lead-time of pull requests of your entire organization, that is, pull requests of all your repositories and plot three charts. Each chart shows different aspects of your process.

They are available by clicking on the Metrics and Stats link below your organization name.

Metrics and Stats link in the organization page

Below, I explain a little bit more of each chart and in what they may help.

Lead-time of your team

This chart shows the dispersion of Lead-Time for pull requests of all repositories. The gray points are closed or merged pull requests, and the blue ones are pull requests that remain open.

Example of organization-wide chart of open/closed pull requests

Example of organization-wide chart of open/closed pull requests

It’s a great tool to understand and improve your process. Using the above chart as an example, here are some questions your team could raise:

  • Why is that pull request taking more than 14-days to be closed or merged?
  • What happened from 11 Aug to 15 Aug that pull requests took more than average to be closed or merged?
  • Why are there too many open pull requests? Should we limit our WIP?

Lead Time Histogram:

Lead-Time is the number of days a pull request remains open. Whether it was closed or merged, it does not matter.

Example shows most of pull requests closed in at most 4 days

Example shows most of pull requests closed in at most 4 days.

Now you can tell just by watching the chart how many days most of the changes take to be merged or closed. In the example above, most of the pull requests are closed or merged at most in 4 days.

Merged Pull Requests

Walk day by day and see how many pull requests were closed or merged on that date. It is an essential chart if you need to understand how external events impact productivity.

Chart shows the number of pull request closed in each day

Chart shows the number of pull request closed in each day

This chart is especially useful to understand the impact of high lead-times. As you decrease your lead-time, more pull requests are closed or merged by day. It means code is being shipped to production faster, that is, a smaller time-to-market.

Expect more metrics soon

We’re working hard on finding useful metrics for you and your team. More repository-specific metrics are coming soon, so keep an eye on our Twitter (@sourcelevelhq) and blog!

We love feedback!

Have you got any suggestions or improvements? We want to hear from you so that we can boost and polish our product together! Don’t hesitate to drop us a line.

If you got curious to know how is your company doing, start our 14-days-trial now and find it out!

Ebert is now SourceLevel

June 24, 2019 in Announcements

As we begin a new phase for our startup, we decided to rename it to SourceLevel.

We think it better reflects what we’re doing: bringing team metrics and automation for code reviews to improve your team.
We’ll be rolling out this change in the following days. Our new home is https://sourcelevel.io.

We’ll update our website, documentation, and our GitHub app.

You don’t need to change anything on your side. Even the .ebert.yml file will continue to work, although you may want to change it to .sourcelevel.yml. 🙂